herbs on my window sill

Starting Seeds
4 Comments

These are the herbs I started the day after Thanksgiving, so it’s taken about two months to grow to this size. Cilantro, dill, thyme, and basil. (There’s also a pot of summer savory at the end that I started last summer.) I started these herbs under lights in the garage where its pretty chilly (about 50F). Now that they’re out on the kitchen window sill it’s warmer for them, but there’s not much sunlight coming in through the window yet. Still, I think they’re looking pretty good.

The basil has grown the slowest and the cilantro the fastest. I suppose that would be predicted since basil is a summer plant and cilantro prefers the cool weather and bolts (goes to seed) in the sun and heat. The cilantro tastes delicious!

I do have 3 or 4 additional pots of each in plain old black plastic pots out in the garage under lights. The basil has refused to grow, the thyme is coming along but it is always a slow growing plant, the dill and cilantro look like they’re ready to garnish some dinners.

Out in the garage trays, I also have a bunch of pots of arugula. That looks like it will make a nice salad soon.

 

4 Comments. Leave new

  • your herbs look wonderful! I like your presentation

    Reply
  • I’ve been a subscriber for a number of years, always enjoying your site. I live about 25 miles west of you and follow your planting schedule closely. I’ve gardened for over 25 years but am especially excited this growing season. I like the look of your new website!

    Reply
  • Have you attempted growing marjoram from seed? If so, do you have any tips? I cannot get it to grow at all for me and I’m thinking I’m doing something wrong, but I simply don’t know what. Please provide any advice you think will help! Thanks!

    Reply
    • I have not grown Marjoram from seed! I’ve grown oregano, thyme, rosemary, etc. But not Marjoram. I’ll get some seed and try it this year. Last year I bought a pot of it. I’m wondering if it will over winter for me.

      I would think growing marjoram would be like growing thyme, oregano and rosemary. Make sure the seeds come from a reliable source and are fresh. Marjoram seeds sometimes aren’t viable for more than 1 year. Start seeds 8-10 weeks before your last frost. The seeds are going to be slow to germinate, maybe 2 weeks, so you need to be careful that they don’t rot before growing. Use new or well-cleaned pots, sterile potting soil. Don’t plant the seeds too deep. Spread them on the top of potting soil and cover with a with a very thin layer of fine soil. Some directions I see on-line say to plant the seeds 1/4 inch deep, but this seems too deep to me. Just barely cover with soil. Water pots very gently. Keep the pots at about 70F. It’s best to keep them under lights while they sprout as some small seeds need light to germinate. Keep lights as bright as you can and close to the pot if they are standard fluorescent tubes and on for 12 hours a day. Water only after the soil becomes a bit dry. Once they sprout, continue to be careful not to over water (but don’t let them dry out too much either of course).

      You can even plant the seeds in winter if you want. This gives you more time to try planting again if they fail. The plants will be in big pots by spring time, so you’ll need space where they can get light.

      Good luck! I hope this helps.

      Reply

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