snow

snow 087
snow 080 snow 081

That’s a 5 foot fence and a totally covered bench. I’ve stopped saving my kitchen scraps because there’s no way to get to my compost bin. And 5 inches of snow/ice are predicted to fall on top of all this tomorrow. Arrgh!!!

17 Comments. Leave new

  • The snow is getting to be a bit much. I could not dig through the snow last night to uncover some sage for dinner…so, I had to use some that I froze.

    I am able to get to our compost bins though. I do have to dig a spot in the middle of the snow to dump the scraps in

    Reply
  • Kathy,

    That is a lot of snow, oh my! We are reaching 70 today and I'm home sick.

    Reply
  • You guys are really getting hammered this year! I'm going to stop complaining about the snow in New Jersey after seeing these photos!

    Reply
  • I feel your pain…6-7 feet in Dec. and now we are well past 120 inches with more today!!

    Reply
  • Marian(LondonUK)
    February 2, 2011 2:20 PM

    Goodness me, it looks pretty but it gets a bit boring getting around and stuff doesn't it. Hope the Gnome has been trained in survival skills!
    Marian (London UK)

    Reply
  • Nicole Reeves
    February 2, 2011 3:13 PM

    Well I think I can sorta sympathize with you today. It's cold for Phoenix with wind chill making it feel like 16 Degrees!! No snow though. 🙂 I haven't been out to look at what the gusty wind and cold did to the garden. I"m sure all this snow makes spring seem all the more glorious when it arrives!! I really enjoy your blog. Thanks for writing!

    Reply
  • We have been shoveling the path to the compost bin. That is the easy shovel. It is only about 10' from my back door.

    Reply
  • Hello,

    I would love to talk to you about an issue that I feel is a hot topic in environmental news. I have written an article that I think your readers would be interested in seeing on your blog.

    I'm looking to promote that idea that by encouraging grocery shoppers to branch out from their usual selections and to join the local food movement, they can help create a more sustainable agricultural system.

    Kori Bubnack
    k.bubnack@gmail.com

    Reply
  • My, that looks very familiar! We got 8 inches last night and are getting another 18 to 24 inches today! The biggest snow of the season so far.. I just shoveled the cold frames and checked on the veggies tucked inside – I may have pulled a few carrots for a snack too! 🙂
    Good luck with all of your snow!
    Niki

    Reply
  • Hello Kathy (and Skippy)!

    Wow, you guys are really buried. Stay cozy!

    I have been reading your blog and have really enjoyed it so far. As an avid gardener, I always appreciate entertaining, accurate information.I have been doing extra research lately, to prepare for spring in my garden. Sorry to post this message as a comment but I could not find another way to contact you.

    Since your blog is well-informed and well-followed, I wanted to ask if you would test a product. It’s called John and Bob’s GrowGreen Smart Soil Solutions. It’s a four-part soil amendment system that completely revitalizes all types of soil, eliminating the need for other supplements. It’s an organic system, containing concentrated humus, minerals and live microbes. The live microbes really play a huge role in conditioning and fertilizing the soil. They break apart clay particles, build up sandy soil and provide extra nutrients to plants.

    The system is really easy to apply. Three products, Maximize, Optimize and Nourish, are dry, granulated ingredients that are simply sprinkled on top of the soil. The fourth, Penetrate, is a liquid fertilizer that is sprayed on. Because they are highly concentrated, they come at a fantastic value to customers. A little goes a long way! John and Bob’s Grow Green Smart Soil Solutions is a unique, integrated system of fertilizer and live microbes that work together to both change the texture of the soil and add vitality, growing stronger, healthier, more productive plants! It’s starting to make a huge difference in my clay-heavy garden.

    We would like to send you a free sample of the John and Bob’s four-part system to try in your garden. All we ask in return is that you review it on your blog and, if you liked the products, recommend it as well. We would appreciate your feedback! You can visit our website to learn more about the system, how it works and why it dramatically improves the health of soil and plants. http://www.johnandbobs.com

    I look forward to hearing back from you. Let me know if you have any questions and if you would like a free sample (enough to treat 1,000 square feet).

    Thanks for your time!

    Andy McGee

    amcgee@everbearingservices.com

    Reply
  • I'm probably the only crazy person who is actually jealous and wishing we were getting that snow. I want a reason to have to hunker down for a couple of days. We only got a bit of freezing rain from this big storm.

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  • HI Kori, Local is great. You can't get more local than growing your own!

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  • Vanessa,

    Yes, a bit of it is really nice. After a while it’s just in the way. Ther is still all the usual stuff you need to do PLUS snow removal and slow driving and trying to park etc. I don’t listen to the news these days, because it’s a pattern now here – one storm after another. This weekend I will get out and shovel my driveway (with my son) down to the pavement (to make room for more snow). The roads are ½ the width of usual. But I really do like the sun being up longer now and the little sprouts coming up under my plant lights….

    Reply
  • I have the same problem getting to my compost bin in winter. You could always freeze your kitchen scraps and add them the next time you get a thaw. This assumes, of course, that your freezer isn't jam-packed with frozen fruits and veggies from your summer garden.

    Reply
  • I like the photo with the bright red plow in the background. Excellent.

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  • It was nice of that plow to come by at the right timing to give some color to the photo.

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  • Not much you can grow in this sort of snow unfortunately; but vefies can be harvested and preserved for use during the colder months.

    Preserves include pickles, bottled vegetables, chutneys and sauces. Preserves will normally keep for a minimum of 12 months at room temperature in a pantry.

    Reply

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